Tackling the Effects of Fall Bird Migration

Oct 26, 2020

Every autumn, from September through November, a natural wonder occurs. Billions of birds from thousands of species travel thousands of miles to get from their breeding grounds to their overwintering areas. As they travel through the US, their strong impact is felt by nearly everyone.

Managing Fall Bird Migration Challenges: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

The Positive Impact

Birds are beautiful and help feather the nest of multiple industries. Migration brings new and beautiful species through our area, driving eco-tourism and sales of everything from bird seed to photography equipment. Their jewel-like colors, riotous calls and voracious appetite for mosquitos and other pest insects make migration both an amazing spectacle and a benefit. Fall is a great time to take up birdwatching and see species that only visit our area for a short time.

The Negative Impact

Large flocks of birds damage crops like corn and autumn fruits, create a danger for airports, and leave behind a giant mess. Canada Geese in particular can cause issues when flocks, drawn by manicured turf, fruits, nuts, and other food sources, swarm to properties. Resident geese populations that cause only minor problems draw in thousands of extra visitors during migration that can cover a property with their droppings in a matter of hours. Flocks of thousands of starlings can also create a big mess in a short amount of time roosting in trees and on buildings and leaving their “white rain” on cars, windows, and unlucky people. With more birds (and their droppings) in the area, the risk that people will come into contact with bird related illnesses also grows. Migratory Bird Management can help you prepare for influxes of wild birds during migration to prevent giant messes and health risks.

Managing Fall Bird Migration Challenges: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Rooftops are common loafing grounds for migrating Canada geese!

Managing Fall Bird Migration Challenges: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Huge flocks of starlings use man-made structures to gather and the resulting “white rain” can cause significant damage and health risks for people!

The Harmful Impact

Migrating birds stop in unfamiliar places to rest and refuel as part of a risky and grueling trip that many will not survive. The attraction of city lights exposes them to dangers that include window collisions, feral/outdoor cat populations, pesticides, and inadequate habitat. MBM can help you keep birds safe on your property with migratory bird safety plans and solutions.

Managing Fall Bird Migration Challenges: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

These birds all struck the windows of a single building in a single day. Their migration has ended thousands of miles too soon.

Contact us to learn about migratory bird management

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